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ANIMATED CHAPTERS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 23 16 13 10 5 3 1 27 30 34
Introduction
Crash
An intersection in Boyle Heights
Lucha's Childhood
Lucha's Quinceañera Song
Mariachi Plaza, Boyle Heights
Jameson's Story
Jameson Portrait
The 2nd Street Tunnel, Downtown Los Angeles
The Reunion
A Rehearsal Studio in the Arts District
First Kiss
Hollenbeck Park, East Los Angeles
Angel's Point
Angel's Point, Elysian Park
Love and Fractals
The Floating Nebula
The Corn Fields, Los Angeles State Historic Park, Chinatown
Wedding
City Hall, Downtown Los Angeles
The Next Years
The Phone Call, Part 1
Traversing between the Arts District and Boyle Heights
A Fortune
Chinatown Plaza
Orlando's Story
Orlando's Fairwell
Evergreen Cemetery
Interlude (Car Wash)
AirStream Trailer, Elysian Park
Passengers
The Roadways, Elysian Park
The Experiment
3rd Street and Broadway
Despair
230 Center St, Arts District
The Disappearance
The Red Notebook
Utter darkness
The Other Woman
The Bradbury Building, Downtown Los Angeles
Hades
Bowtie Parcel, Los Angeles River
Breakthrough
Lucha and Orlando in Love
Historic Core, Downtown Los Angeles
Lucha Portrait
Alongside the LA River, Interstate 5
Orlando In Love
Orfeo
The Million Dollar Theater
Orlando Portrait
Libros Schmibros Book Store, Boyle Heights
Farewell From the Roof Tops
Rooftops, Toy Factory Lofts, Biscuit Lofts, Ito Building Tower, Arts District
Old Age Like a Dream
The Phone Call, Part 2
Chavez Ravine, Elysian Park
Finale
The Central Hub

The Floating Nebula

Location: The Corn Fields, Los Angeles State Historic Park, Chinatown
Lucha: Alisa Guardiola
Jameson: Micaela Taylor
Angel: Quayla Bramble
Choreography: Danielle Agami
Recording: Matt Cook, Jeff Curtin, Zachary Crumrine, Justin Asher
Featuring members of the Trinity Youth Chorus, NYC: Erica D’Acona, Katie Fountain, Jalene Lipowitz, Marcella Roy, Elisa Sikula, Josie Zenger
Music by Ellen Reid
Text by Mandy Kahn
A peak moment in Lucha and Jameson’s love: the dancing stars whirl past the two on a nightime motorcycle journey. Jameons presents Lucha with her very own white jacket. The sound of a children’s chorus accompanies them on a romantic, mystical journey.

Floats the Roving Nebula

Excerpt from the Hopscotch album, Track 8. Composer, Ellen Reid

Notes from Director, Yuval Sharon:

“This chapter expressed how two people in love become connected to the deepest mysteries of the universe, that the depth of Lucha and Jameson’s love magnifies and multiplies them but also, in a way, obliterates them. An angel figure leads the audience into a fenced off, almost forgotten corner of a park underneath the Broadway viaduct. Cars whiz by overhead, and every five minutes or so a Metro train goes by.

“There we see Lucha and Jameson, suddenly seeming so small and alone, cast as two dancers on a patch of green AstroTurf lined with stars. The motorcycle sculpture from Chapter 2 stands there. Quayla as the angel sang live and striking chimes as she walks, while an 8-channel sound installation surrounding played Ellen’s haunting work for children’s choir.

“This chapter went through bigger changes than any other. Ellen originally imagined the children’s choir to be live in the space – an idea I loved, until the logistics of children singing the same piece 24 times a day every weekend for six weeks finally defeated us. Ellen’s idea of recording the children in a spatialized format offered a great solution.

Composer Ellen Reid

“My original staging idea was to have two actors as Jameson and Lucha sitting on the motorcycle sculpture, while the dancing Lucha and Jameson activated the space around them – picking up on the ideas in the Chapter 10 animation of the multiverse offering innumerable alternative versions of the self. In that chapter, Jameson asks Lucha: ‘How do you know you’re in love with me, when there are so many you’s and so many me’s?’ That line felt central not just to the overarching concepts of Hopscotch but to the practical realization of the piece: all the many actors, singers, musicians playing Lucha, Jameson, and Orlando, and how they all add up to a single representation of their identities. But I had to cut ten performers out of the total scope of Hopscotch to keep to our budget – and hey, we still had a cast of 126! – so the two silent actors sitting on a motorcycle all day long were an easy target for the axe. We tried replacing them with life-size puppets of Lucha and Jameson, but they got knocked over and crushed by the motorcycle at the first rehearsal. When we picked them up again and saw that they looked like mangled corpses, they got cut as well.

“The warehouse was also going to have the blue rotary telephone that Lucha uses to call herself just sitting there, with a recording of the two Luchas singing to each other. I loved the idea that this moment where Lucha and Jameson are at one with the universe was also the actual site of the blue telephone she finds to call her younger self. But when we shifted venues and the Viaduct didn’t have a good location for the phone, we moved it to the center of the Central Hub – in many ways a more fitting location for the object.”